Planned Spaces

 

Following the Spanish Civil War, and with new changes in the economic model, Spain experienced a large migration from the countryside to the city. One of the cities most affected by this was Madrid. This urban growth without any sort of planning and subject to speculation and lack of infrastructure overwhelmed the city, creating many poor, ramshackle neighborhoods on the outskirts, with all the danger of social exclusion they entail. In 1957 the Madrid Social Emergency Plan was approved, beginning the cleaning up of these neighborhoods and the construction of subsidized housing for the growing population. These neighborhoods were created as dumping grounds for people, commuter suburbs whose architecture, with its highly pragmatic rationalist influences that were –at the time—cutting-edge, have aged very badly. This series depicts what remains of those “planned” neighborhoods 50 years later. To highlight that functionality, groups of people are included in the frame in an attempt to
personalize them and convert them, simply, into just another element of the setting.

Espacios Planificados # 3 / 2010 / Inyección de tinta / 80×101 cm / Ed. 5

Espacios Planificados # 5 / 2010 / Inyección de tinta / 80×101 cm / Ed. 5

Espacios Planificados # 4 / 2010 / Inyección de tinta / 80×101 cm / Ed. 5

Espacios Planificados # 1 / 2010 / Inyección de tinta / 80×101 cm / Ed. 5

Espacios Planificados # 6 / 2010 / Inyección de tinta / 80×101 cm / Ed. 5

Espacios Planificados # 2 / 2010 / Inyección de tinta / 80×101 cm / Ed. 5

Espacios Planificados # 7 / 2010 / Inyección de tinta / 80×101 cm / Ed. 5

Espacios Planificados # 8 / 2010 / Inyección de tinta / 80×101 cm / Ed. 5

Espacios Planificados # 10 / 2010 / Inyección de tinta / 80×101 cm / Ed. 5